Tag Archives: Bacteria

Fist bumps are determined to be a healthier alternative to handshakes

successful-businessmen-shaking-hands-100223938While hand shakes are the traditional professional greeting, a recent study published in the American Journal of Infection Control says that it is also a great way to transfer bacteria. The researchers dipped latex gloves in Escherichia Coli, and then either shook hands, gave high-fives, or fist bumped. According to the results, a fist bump transferred the least amount of bacteria between gloves, and the hand shake transferred the most. Firmer handshakes, longer fist bumps and high-fives were also determined to be better ways of transferring bacteria. This could mean a change in the way health care professionals greet each other, especially in hospitals where bacterial resistance has become a problem. What measures do you take to reduce bacteria transmission?

Find out more from The New York Times

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Weight loss: Is the secret in your bacteria?

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Trial published by the Journal of Microbiology Ecology released information that may hint that management of gut microbiota may be the secret to managing weight. Shanghai researchers looked into gut microbiota and its connection to weight. Ninety three obese patients were placed on a dietary regime with whole grains, traditional Chinese medicinal foods, and prebiotics for 9 weeks.  Patients were evaluated at the end of 9 weeks and then 14 weeks later demonstrating an average weight loss of 5kg. Researchers claim diet management improved insulin sensitivity, lipid profiles, and blood pressure. In addition to weight loss, what health benefits can potentially be gained from managing our natural flora?

For the article visit BBC

For the study visit the Journal of Microbiology Ecology

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Breast Milk Bought Online Found to be Contaminated

A recent study performed at the Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Ohio discovered high levels of harmful bacteria and contamination in breast milk purchased over the internet. The study analyzed 101 batches of milk that were purchased on milk sharing websites and found that 74% of the samples contained harmful disease-causing bacteria like E. coli, Streptococci and even Cytomegalovirus. Researchers determined those samples to be unsafe to give to infants, especially preemies. Although the FDA does not recommend feeding babies breast milk acquired via the Web, its sale is not regulated online.

How often do you counsel your patients who are new mothers about the benefits of breastfeeding? What are some safer alternatives to purchasing breast milk online?

For more information, click here.