Tag Archives: Complementary alternative medicine

NIH and VA address pain and related conditions in U.S. military personnel, veterans, and their families: Research will focus on nondrug approaches.

medicine-100176550Chronic pain and associated conditions have increasingly become a problem in the United States, especially in those who are currently serving or have served military time for our country. Thirteen research projects, which are to be funded $21.7 million within the next five years by the U.S. Veteran’s Affairs, National Institutes of Health’s National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, and National Institute on Drug Abuse, will investigate non-pharmacological treatments for these conditions. Due to the current increase in opiate prescribing and abuse, alternative options are to be further explored. The research will investigate skills which can better manage symptoms of their conditions and prevent their progression. This is expected to help more appropriately treat these patients while driving down healthcare costs and curbing the overuse or misuse of opiate medications.

What do you think about the current opiate prescribing practices in this patient population? How do you currently manage patients with pain and related conditions?

 

For additional information, please visit NIH.

 

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Complementary and Integrative Health Practices in the Real World

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The Director of the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Josephine Briggs, MD shares her thoughts on a recent publication in the journal Headache by Robert Cowan, MD. Both are trying to raise awareness of what patients visiting clinicians might be utilizing in terms of conventional and complementary approaches. There are more Evidence-Based resources available to conventional practitioners on CAM than ever before. What are your thoughts on Dr. Briggs commentary?

 

For additional information please see, the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

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A curriculum including complementary alternative medicine for medical students

 

 

Surgeon YogaWith the rising trend towards a greener and more natural lifestyle, the latest issue of the British Medical Journal is making its reader aware of the continuing debate related to alternative approaches to health and well-being. Some say that including complementary alternative medicine (CAM) in the medical school curriculum is necessary in order for a medical professional to provide a wide range of options for patients while others caution the idea of teaching students to recommend treatments without evidence of efficacy or safety. Those in favor argue that lifestyle choices such as performing yoga and meditation has been shown to improve overall health while those against it portray CAM as “seductive yet utterly devoid of scientific merit”. Based on your personal knowledge and experience, should medical students be taught complementary alternative medicine? Why or why not?

 

For the article, visit BMJ

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