Tag Archives: depression

More College Freshmen Report Having Felt Depressed

ID-10065994An increasing number of freshmen are feeling depressed and overwhelmed, according to an annual survey. “The American Freshman: National Norms Fall 2014,” surveyed over 150,000 students and found that 9.5% of respondents had frequently “felt depressed” during the past year, a significant rise over the 6.1% reported 5 years ago. Those who “felt overwhelmed” by schoolwork and other commitments rose to 34.6 percent from 27.1 percent.“It’s a public health issue,” said Dr. Anthony L. Rostain, a psychiatrist and co-chairman of a University of Pennsylvania task force on students’ emotional health. “We’re expecting more of students: There’s a sense of having to compete in a global economy, and they think they have to be on top of their game all the time. It’s no wonder they feel overwhelmed.” The survey also reported that students are spending less time watching television and surprisingly, a decline in drinking and smoking cigarettes among college freshman. How do you speak to young people about stress? What are your favorite strategies in dealing with stress?

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How physical exercise protects the brain from stress-induced depression.

badminton-player-isolated-on-white-background-100204162For years, exercise has been recognized as an effective way to prevent stress-induced depression, yet until now the mechanism had not been understood. It was initially believed that trained skeletal muscle produced a substance protective towards the brain. However, researchers at the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden shared their findings using mice models showing something different. Instead of generating a protective substance in the body, the exercised skeletal muscle produces an enzyme that helps to excrete damaging, stress-related substances from the blood. Depression remains to be a widely misunderstood disorder, but this research reinforces the importance of exercise in its treatment and could provide insight into novel therapies.  What other non-pharmacological interventions do you recommend to patients who experience stress-induced depression?

 

 

For additional information, please visit ScienceDaily.

 

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Cycling is Far More Likely to Increase Your Life Expectancy

bicycle-in-the-park-100148071The researchers from the Medical Research Council, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and University College London looked at the cycle for hire scheme for a course of one year and found that the benefits from physical activity outweighed the negative impact of injuries and air pollutions in people age 45-59.Men benefited the most in terms of reduction of heart disease, while women had most benefit in terms of reduction in depression. Would you consider switching to bicycling as your main means of transportation if the system was available in your area? Would you cycle more as an exercise?

For additional information, please see BBC News Health.

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Screaming at Your Misbehaving Teen May Backfire.

Family_ProblemsThe journal Child Development published a new study which followed almost 1000 two-parent families with children at ages 13 and 14. It revealed that parents who discipline their teenagers by screaming, cursing and name-calling actually increase their teenager’s aggressive behavior. Researchers discovered that children whose parents used higher levels of harsh verbal discipline experienced larger increases in behavior problems the next year, including fighting with peers, trouble in school, lying to parents, as well as symptoms of depression. What are your thoughts on this study? What behavioral modifications do you recommend to parents who seek your advice?

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Image Courtesty of [David Castillo Dominici ]  FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Efficacy of Acupuncture in The Treatment of Sexual Dysfunction Secondary to Antidepressants

A recent study published in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine aimed to assess suggested benefit of acupuncture in the treatment of sexual dysfunction linked to SSRI and SNRI – antidepressant use. The study was conducted in Toronto/Canada for 12 consecutive week of acupuncture protocol treatment. Participants have been assessed throughout a weekly questionnaire that looked for symptoms of depression, anxiety and sexual function.  The study concluded that integrating medical, complementary and alternative medicine would benefit the patient for both aspects of disease and side effect secondary to the drug being used. How often do you recommend your patients to see an acupuncturist?

Please follow this link for more information:

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10.1089/acm.2012.0751

 

 

Using downward dogs to treat depression

A recent study published in the journal, Frontiers in Psychiatry compared over 100 studies to see how efficacious yoga is for different psychiatric disorders including depression, schizophrenia, and ADHD. The evidence suggests that yoga can be beneficial for sleeping problems, ADHD, depression, and schizophrenia, where yoga could be offered to patients as another useful, low-cost alternative. What other non-pharmacologic options do you suggest to your patients with mental health concerns?

For more information, please visit CNN.

 

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Ease Depression by Promoting Exercise to Patients with Heart Failure

A new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggests that patients with heart failure and depression may benefit from regular, moderate exercise.  Although the results of the study were modest, exercising 90 to 120 minutes a week reduced patient’s risk of re-hospitalizations and deaths related to heart problems. Patients should receive proper counseling from physicians prior to starting new exercise regimens. How do you encourage your patients to exercise more consistently?

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Daffodils may be useful in treating depression

A new study published in the Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology looks at ways in which daffodils may help to treat depression. One of the most difficult aspects of psychopharmacology is discovering compounds that can pass the blood brain barrier. A scientific research group from the University of Copenhagen has discovered that compounds from Crinum and Crytanthus from a South African species of snowdrops and daffodils can effectively pass the brain’s defensive barrier. What are some of your recommendations for someone with symptoms of depression?

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/246974.php