Tag Archives: Diabetes mellitus type 2

Mediterranean Diet May Reduce Diabetes Risk in Older People

Serge Bertasius PhotographyThe Mediterranean Diet has shown to be beneficial in reducing the incidence of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in elderly patients. The PREDIMED (Prevención con Dieta Mediterránea) cardiovascular prevention trial was a multicenter trial in Spain involving 3,451 participants, aged 55-80 years old, who were randomized into three groups: a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra virgin olive oil (EVOO), a Mediterranean diet supplemented with mixed nuts, or a control diet low in fats. The participants were asked not to increase their physical activity and were also given food advice from dieticians on which foods to eat. Median 4.1 years follow-up showed people eating a Mediterranean diet supplemented with EVOO had a relative reduction of 40% in diabetes risk compared with the control group, while people eating a Mediterranean diet supplemented with mixed nuts had a relative reduction of 18%. How often do you discuss Mediterranean diet with your patients? What other chronic conditions benefit from the Mediterranean diet based on the recent research?

For additional information, please see JAMA.

Image Courtesy of [Serge Bertasius Photography]/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 

Advertisements

Wii Fit games improve HbA1c in patients with diabetes

According to a recent study conducted in 220 diabetic patients, playing Nintendo’s Wii Fit Plus for half an hour a day over three months can improve health. Type 2 diabetic patients were randomized into a group that used the game and a control group. After 12 weeks, researchers found that patients in the intervention group had an improvement in HbA1c, lost weight as well as improved their blood glucose levels. How do you try to stay active during the holiday season? 

For more information please click here

A hearty breakfast good for diabetics?

A recent Israeli study presented at the annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes in Barcelona (Sept 25, 2013) reported that type 2 diabetics who ate a bigger breakfast had lowered blood sugars. Those in the big breakfast group consumed approximately 30% of daily calories for breakfast (consisting of more protein and fat) compared to 12.5% for those in the small breakfast group. Researchers found that over a 3 month period, patients who were in the large breakfast group had a reduction in blood glucose levels and blood pressure, reported less hunger, and cut back on daily diabetic medication. How often do you discuss breakfast with your patients? What are your typical breakfast foods recommendations for diabetics?

For additional information, click here.

 

Fruit consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes: results from three prospective longitudinal cohort studies.

43__fruit_in_crate_with_loose_apples_rtgA recent study published in the British Medical Journal looked at  the diets of more than 187,000 people in the US. People eating three servings of fruit per week, particularly blueberries, apples and grapes had a reduced risk of developing type-2 diabetes. The researchers believe this is because fruits contain high levels of anthocyanins, which have been shown to enhance glucose uptake in mice. However, when researchers looked at the effects of fruit juice consumption, they found a slightly increased risk of type-2 diabetes. The study recommended that replacing weekly fruit juice consumption with whole fruits could bring health benefit. What are your thoughts on this study? What do you recommend as part of a balanced and healthy diet?

For more information, please click here.

Image courtesy of [Grant Cochrane] / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Exercise Alone May Help Those With Type 2 Diabetes

Lifestyle modification has been the corner stone in both preventing and treating type 2 Diabetes. However a recent Dutch study, published in the Journal of Radiologyconcluded that exercise alone may benefit type 2 DM patients with no other additional modifications; such as diet. The study included 12 subjects that were willing to do moderate exercise for six months. Outcomes were measured using an MRI that assessed heart function and the amount of visceral fat before and after the exercise. Results revealed that there were no changes in heart function, despite the significant decrease in visceral fat around the heart, liver and abdomen. How do you encourage your patients to exercise regularly?

Please follow this link for more information

Eating more red meat tied to higher diabetes risk

Journal of American Medical Association Internal Medicine just published a study about the correlation of red meat and diabetes risk. Currently in the US, about 26 million people have Diabetes, with 95 percent of those cases being Type 2 Diabetes. The study followed about 149,000 US men and women for 12-16 years and found that decreased consumption of red meat lowers the risk of Type 2 Diabetes by 14 % in the long run. What alternatives to red meat do you recommend to your patients for maintenance of a healthy diet?

To access the complete study, click here.

Can Coffee Bean Extract Help Control Blood Sugar?

A small study conducted in India suggests that there is association between extract of coffee beans and blood glucose control. Thirty normal weight men and women without diabetes were evaluated and green coffee bean extract appeared to lower blood glucose in those individuals.  What do you typically recommend to patients with blood glucose control issues? Have you recommended green coffee bean extract before?

For additonal information, please click WebMD

Walnut Consumption Is Associated with Lower Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Women

A study published in the recent Journal of Nutrition followed 58,603 women aged 52-77 years and evaluated a relationship between reduced risk of Type II diabetes in Women and walnut intake. The study suggests that the higher walnut intake was related to a significantly lowered risk of type II diabetes in women. What nuts and seeds do you incorporate into your diet?  What are your favorite health related benefits for doing that?

For additional information, please go to  Journal of Nutrition