Tag Archives: diet

In search of a personalised diet

ID-100123942A new study lead by BBC Science and obesity experts explains every person has different eating habits and specific diets are needed for each person based on their hormones, genes,cognitive behavior etc. Instead of following a standard diet it is important to focus on your eating habits first to develop a diet specific for you. Scientists from Oxford and Cambridge followed and observed eating trends of 5 dieters for three months in their homes. The study looked at three types of over eaters, feasters, constant cravers and emotional eaters. The study found diets are based off habits. The feasters, people who have a hard time stopping eating, have a problem with their gut hormone balance. Constant cravers, people that are always hungry, have certain genes that disrupt the signals sent to the brain so they do not know when they are full. Emotional eaters eat when they feel anxious or stressed which is a habit they have developed. Overall, feasters lost the most weight and constant cravers had the hardest time losing weight. Dieters learned what type of eater they were and experts came up with plans to help them change their eating habits and practice the best diet for them. Although personalized diets are a new trend, experts say there is a lot of potential to help people lose more weight once they know more about their own body and how it affects their eating habits. Depending on the type of eater you are determines the type of diet you should try.

Would a personalized diet help people to lose weight?

For more information click here

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Diet may influence ovarian cancer survival

female-reproductive-system-100273659A new study has revealed at a healthy diet prior to a diagnosis of ovarian cancer will increase the odds of survival in the following years. A healthier diet, rich in vegetables, fruits, and whole grains, and low in processed foods will help build immunity and reduce inflammation in the body. Both of these factors can be crucial when fighting the disease. In this observational study, women who consumed the healthiest diets were 27% less likely to die than those with the poorest diets. Those consuming the healthiest foods were also more likely to continue their good habits post-diagnosis and have access to better care. However, those with diabetes and a waist circumference over 34 inches, appeared to have lower survival rates. Before lifestyle recommendations can be standardized regarding prevention and increasing survival of ovarian cancer, randomized control trials should also be completed. Which lifestyle changes do you recommend in your practice for those looking to prevent ovarian cancer or better their prognosis?

 

For additional information on this study, go to Reuters.

 

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Weight loss: Is the secret in your bacteria?

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Trial published by the Journal of Microbiology Ecology released information that may hint that management of gut microbiota may be the secret to managing weight. Shanghai researchers looked into gut microbiota and its connection to weight. Ninety three obese patients were placed on a dietary regime with whole grains, traditional Chinese medicinal foods, and prebiotics for 9 weeks.  Patients were evaluated at the end of 9 weeks and then 14 weeks later demonstrating an average weight loss of 5kg. Researchers claim diet management improved insulin sensitivity, lipid profiles, and blood pressure. In addition to weight loss, what health benefits can potentially be gained from managing our natural flora?

For the article visit BBC

For the study visit the Journal of Microbiology Ecology

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Beans and Peas Lower Cholesterol

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A recent six week trial published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal evaluated over 1,000 patients and shown that just one serving of legumes (peas, beans, chickpeas, and lentils) can decrease one’s total LDL by 5 percent. A decrease by 5 percent leads to a 5-6 percent reduction in heart attack and other major cardiovascular events. What are your favorite recipes that incorporate legumes?

For additional information visit NYT

For the study visit CMAJ

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Drinking Milk Linked to Osteoarthritis Relief

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Milk is often advertised for strong bones, however, a new study published by Arthritis Care & Research claims that increasing one’s milk intake may lead to a decrease in osteoarthritis progression. The study evaluated 2,148 patients of both sexes suggesting that osteoarthritis progression was decreased in women who consumed more than 7 glasses a week. The authors noted that although they were unable to establish a definitive link between milk ingestion and decrease in osteoarthritis progression, they encourage readers to drink milk that is low-fat or fat-free regardless of sex. What are your thoughts on this research?  What are your typical recommendations to your patients who are trying to slow down their disease progression?

Read the study at Arthritis Care & Research
For additional information visit The New York Times
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Grocery coupons can encourage healthful eating

SaleWe all receive those grocery flyers and coupons in the mail; most of the sale items are associated with processed foods, snacks, and sugared beverages. What if there was a way to encourage purchases of healthier foods such as vegetables and fruits?  A recent study published in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s journal, Prevent Chronic Disease decided to put produce couponing to the test. Linkwell Health, a marketing company  sent coupons, recipes, and information on healthful diets to patients enrolled in a health insurance plan who had chronic health problems associated with poor diets. The study reported results of improved purchases of fruits, vegetables, lean meats, and seafood. What are some strategies you can recommend to your patients to encourage them to purchase a more healthful diet?

 

 

For additional information, please visit The Washington Post

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Watermelon could help lower blood pressure

watermelonA new study published in the American Journal of Hypertension suggests that consuming watermelon may help lower blood pressure and have positive impact on other vascular parameters. This cross-over study evaluated the effects of watermelon extracts in 13 middle-aged obese patients suffering from high blood pressure. What other foods do you recommend your patients who are trying to decrease their blood pressure?

 

For additional information, please visit Science Daily

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Food companies cut back on calories

junk-food-and-big-fat-stomach-10090072In a five year study sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to reduce childhood obesity in the United States, an estimated 6.4 trillion calories were reduced in food and beverages by some of the nation’s largest food companies including Coca-Cola, PepsiCo, and Campbell’s. This resulted in an average of 78 calories cut out of an American’s daily diet. What are your thoughts about this research? How great of an impact do you think this will have on the struggle to eliminate childhood obesity?

For additional information, please see NY Times.

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Best Diets by US News

It is that time of the year when US News evaluated again different diets and gave them star ratings according to their categories.  Have you experimented or recommended any of them?  What are your thoughts on the ratings?

For more information, please click here.

A lifetime of too much copper in our diets may be contributing to Alzheimer’s disease

plumaWith previous studies suggesting that copper may protect the brain, controversy has occurred with a recently published study.  This study found that copper can actually cause the accumulation of toxic proteins, amyloid beta, which forms the plaques linked to Alzheimer’s disease. The animal study discovered that it was harder for the brain to get rid of the protein with increased ingestion of copper metal via tap water. Researches have suggested that people treat these results with caution and to not cut copper out of their diet. Copper can be found in tap water, red meat, shellfish as well as fruit and vegetables, which are all still very vital for a healthy body. What are your thoughts about these findings?

For more information, please click here.

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