Tag Archives: diet/nutrition

Higher-fiber diet linked to lower risk of death

ID-100232441The American Journal of Epidemiology is encouraging individuals to increase their daily dietary fiber intake. Dr. Yang of the Shanghai Cancer Institute in China, collected data from 17 previous studies and reported people who ate the greatest amount of fiber were 16 % less likely to die than those who ate the least amount. The more fiber people ate the less likely they were to die from any cause. Eight of these studies proved increasing dietary fiber by 10 grams a day would decrease risk for any cause of death by 10 %. Researchers say fiber-rich foods lower the risk of chronic diseases by lowering blood pressure, cholesterol, glucose, insulin and reducing inflammation. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture women should consume 25 grams a day and men about 38 grams a day.It has been reported that the U.S population only consumes half the recommended goal. It is important to remember when increasing your daily fiber intake to do it slowly and drink plenty of water. Fiber-rich foods to add to your daily diet include whole grains, fruits, vegetables and legumes. What are some of your favorite recipes/suggestions that incorporate these foods/ingredients?

For additional information click here

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Authors Of The Last Study Backing Dr. Oz’s “Magic Weight Loss Cure” Retract Their Research

measuring-tape-around-apple-10042494The study that supports the use of green coffee bean extract for weight loss and was promoted in Dr. Oz’s Show as the “Magic weight loss cure”, has been retracted by its authors. They explained that the sponsors of the study, the green coffee bean extract manufacturer, could not assure the validity of the data. Moreover, the company, Applied Food Sciences Inc., has been charged by the Federal Trade Commission for using the results of the flawed study to make baseless claims. What are your thoughts about weight loss products and specifically green coffee bean extract? What other products are you uncomfortable recommending?

For more information, please visit Huffington Post.

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Egg-Rich Diet Not Harmful in Type 2 Diabetes

eggs-on-white-background-100229881A new study has revealed that eating eggs does not have bad effects on cholesterol level in people with type 2 diabetes. In contrast, egg-rich diet has more benefits than harm. The study, conducted in Australia and presented at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes 2014 Meeting, has found that eating 2 eggs per day for 6 days per week for 3 months did not show a significant change in the cholesterol level comparing to eating less than 2 eggs a week for the same period. On the other hand, the high-egg group showed a trend toward HDL improvement. Moreover, egg-rich diet was reported to be more enjoyable and hunger-fulfilling. What are your favorite egg recipes?

For additional information, please visit WebMD.

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Food Serving Sizes Getting a Reality Check

rakratchada torsapThe Nutrition Food Label is undergoing an update in the near future. The aim of the new Nutrition Food Label is to bring serving sizes and calories closer to what people are actually eating today. The current 1993 Nutrition Facts Label was based on food consumption in the 1970s and 80s. The proposed label would prominently display, in bold and larger font size, the number of calories and servings per container. The new label would also change “Amount Per Serving” to “Amount Per (Serving Size) and require listing of added sugars. Ice cream and soft drinks are two food products that will undergo change from the new Nutrition Food Label proposals. What are your opinions regarding the proposed Nutrition Food Label updates? What strategies can you suggest for your patients in order to help them understand the right serving size to consume based on current nutrition labels?

For additional information, please see FDA.

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Excess added sugar intake tied to death

crepe-cake-100194838In a recent study published in JAMA Internal Medicine, researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that participants who consumed more added sugar in their diet were more likely to die of heart disease. Of the 31,000 U.S. adults surveyed between 1988 and 2010, an average of 15 to 17 percent of their daily calorie intake was from added sugars. This is greater than the recommended amount set by the American Heart Association of 100 calories of added sugars per day for women and 150 calories for men and the World Health Organization’s recommendation of 10 percent as the limit. The results showed that participants who consumed between 10 and 25 percent were at a 30 percent increase for cardiovascular disease death and those who consumed 25 percent or more were twice as likely. What tips do you have for patients to minimize added sugar intake?

For additional information, please click Reuters.

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Carbohydrate-rich foods can cause higher recurrence of colon cancer

Results of a recent seven-year observational study were published in the journal of the National Cancer Institute suggesting that patient’s high consumption of carbohydrate-rich foods may increase their chance of dying from a recurrence of their colon cancer by 80%.  It appears that carbohydrate-rich diet elevates blood sugar and insulin which may act as fuel for growing cancer cells. Are you familiar with the low glycemic index and load foods? How often do you discuss these with your patients?

For additional information, please see article from New York Times.  “Image courtesy of [Paul]/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Consumption of fish and omega-3 fatty acids is associated with decreased risk of cerebrovascular disease

A recent meta-analysis published inthe British Medical Journal (BMJ) evaluated the association between fish consumption, long-chain omega-3 fatty acids, and the risk of cerebrovascular disease.  Researchers included prospective cohort studies as well as randomized controlled trials and concluded that consumption of omega-3 fatty acids and fish are associated with a decreased risk of cerebrovascular disease. How do you educate your patients about all the recent conflicting evidence aboutconsuming fish and omega-3 fatty acids?

For more information, please read the full article in BMJ.

Although implicated in other disease states, trans fats are not associated with insulin resistance and diabetes

Consumption of trans fatty acids has been linked to increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. A number of government agencies put a ban on consumption of trans fatty acids after a recommendation from the American Heart Association. A recent meta-analysis of randomized, placebo-controlled trials published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (AJCN) evaluated the association between consumption of trans fats and its effects on blood glucose levels, diabetes, and insulin resistance.  Researchers concluded that increased trans fatty acid intake is not associated with changes in insulin sensitivity and glucose levels.  What dietary counseling do you provide to patients with insulin resistance or diabetes?

To find out more, please read the full article in the AJCN.

Pediatricians report on organic foods in children

A clinical report published in the journal Pediatrics discusses the health and environmental advantages and disadvantages of organic foods. Itdefines the term “organic”, reviews food-labeling standards and farming practices, discusses environmental implications of conventional vs. organic techniques.  The reportstates that eating organic fruits and vegetables do not provide additional nutrition in comparison with the conventionally grown foods, butcontain fewer pesticides related to a variety of illnesses. The report recommends that parents should aim to provide their families a diet rich in fruits and vegetables. What are your thoughtsand recommendations on organic/local/sustainably grown foods?

For more information see Pediatrics.

FDA investigates the safety of energy drinks

Yesterday, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) began investigating reports of five deaths that may be associated with “Monster” energy drinks. A 12 oz can of the energy drink contains 105 mg of caffeine, while a 12 oz can of Coca-Cola contains 35 mg. Monster Beverage Corporation is being sued by the family of a 14 year old Maryland girl, who died after drinking two cans of the energy drink in a 24 hour period.  How often do you consume energy drinks? What are some safer alternatives to energy drinks?

For more information, please read the article in NY Times.