Tag Archives: Disease States

Exposure To Pollutants In First Two Years Of Life Might Lead To Autism

smog-10016053A new study by Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health has revealed that children who were exposed to air pollutants during their first two years of life are more likely to develop Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The study, which was presented in the American Association for Aerosol Research annual meeting in Orlando, Florida, has explained that the risk is related mainly to two pollutants: chromium, which is released by combustion processes and metal industries, and styrene, the product of poly styrene plastics and resins. What are your thoughts about air pollution? What should be done to prevent its negative effects, especially on children?

For more information, please visit Youth Health Magazine.

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Animal Study Shows High-Fat Diet is More Harmful to Males than Females

classic-hamburger-sandwich-100188767Based on a new study published in the journal Cell Reports, the biological response to high-fat diet in male and female brains are not the same. According to the study, the brains of male mice became inflamed and their heart were damaged after given a steady high-fat meals, while nothing of that happened to the female mice. Interestingly, female brains have been found to produce anti-inflammatory chemicals that kept them from getting harmed by high-fat diet. However, further studies are still needed to prove these results on humans. How much do your dietary recommendations vary in men and women? What are your thoughts about this research?

To read more, please visit News Medical.

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Egg-Rich Diet Not Harmful in Type 2 Diabetes

eggs-on-white-background-100229881A new study has revealed that eating eggs does not have bad effects on cholesterol level in people with type 2 diabetes. In contrast, egg-rich diet has more benefits than harm. The study, conducted in Australia and presented at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes 2014 Meeting, has found that eating 2 eggs per day for 6 days per week for 3 months did not show a significant change in the cholesterol level comparing to eating less than 2 eggs a week for the same period. On the other hand, the high-egg group showed a trend toward HDL improvement. Moreover, egg-rich diet was reported to be more enjoyable and hunger-fulfilling. What are your favorite egg recipes?

For additional information, please visit WebMD.

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Fried Foods and Gestational Diabetes

buffalo-chicken-wing-100225553Gestational diabetes, a common pregnancy complication, has been found to be possibly related to eating fried foods on a regular basis. The research published in the journal Diabetologia discovered 13% increase in gestational diabetes among pregnant women who eat fried foods one to three times per week comparing to ones who eat once a week. The percentage escalates to 31% and more than 50% for those who eat four to six times and seven or more times per week, respectively. However, the cause-effect relationship has not been yet established in this study, and more evidence is needed. How do you typically counsel your pregnant patients about healthy nutrition? What are some of the recommendations that you make?

For more information, please visit WebMD.

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Soda Producers Set Goals on Cutting U.S. Beverage Calories

colaRecognizing that they are a part of the obesity problem in the United States, PepsiCo, Coca-Cola Co, and Dr.Pepper Snapple Group have come to an agreement with the Alliance for a Healthier Generation to pledge to cut calories consumed by beverages by 20% by the year 2025. Their plan is to create smaller portion sizes, as well as promote water and non-calorie options more effectively. Due to a cap on sugary drink portions now in effect in New York, a soda ban in schools, and a possible tax on these soft drinks in San Francisco in the near future, this may be their attempt to stay appealing to customers. Since the peak of soda sales in 1998, the amount of calories consumed by Americans from sugary drinks has decreased by 23 percent due to an increased concern with our health. As the general population has become more conscious of disease states such as diabetes, they have started to opt for healthier options, including water and beverages that do not contain aspartame. Still, experts agree that more needs to be done in order to decrease obesity rates.

How do you feel about more aggressive government-instituted restrictions on these products?  How comfortable would you be with instituting potential penalties on these companies if they cannot fulfill their promise by 2025?

To read more, please visit WSJ.

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Excess added sugar intake tied to death

crepe-cake-100194838In a recent study published in JAMA Internal Medicine, researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that participants who consumed more added sugar in their diet were more likely to die of heart disease. Of the 31,000 U.S. adults surveyed between 1988 and 2010, an average of 15 to 17 percent of their daily calorie intake was from added sugars. This is greater than the recommended amount set by the American Heart Association of 100 calories of added sugars per day for women and 150 calories for men and the World Health Organization’s recommendation of 10 percent as the limit. The results showed that participants who consumed between 10 and 25 percent were at a 30 percent increase for cardiovascular disease death and those who consumed 25 percent or more were twice as likely. What tips do you have for patients to minimize added sugar intake?

For additional information, please click Reuters.

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Antibiotic use in animals linked to bacterial resistance in humans

cow-milking-facility-100193460In an analysis conducted by the Food and Drug Administration on the use of antibiotics in animal feed, scientists found that 18 out of 30 of them may increase the risk of human exposure to antibiotic-resistant bacteria. There was insufficient information for the scientists to review the other 12 antibiotics. Even though the FDA has made efforts to reduce the use of antibiotics in animals, it is still broadly used. What are your thoughts about this article? What are your recommendations to minimize human exposure to antibiotic-resistant bacteria?

For additional information, please click NYT.

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Good cholesterol may clog arteries

cholesterol-meter-10069234In a recent study published in Nature Medicine, researchers at the Cleveland Clinic found that high-density lipoprotein (HDL) or “good” cholesterol can become dysfunctional and lose its protective properties. When HDL becomes abnormal, it may enter the bloodstream and clog the arteries. Of the 627 patients in the study, researchers found that those who had higher blood levels of abnormal HDL were at greater risk of heart disease. What are your thoughts about this study?

For additional information, please click BCC.

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Soda coloring may be dangerous to your health

colas-100172977Consumer Reports, the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer, and the state of California announce that a chemical known as 4-methylimidazole or 4-Mel found in many soft drinks and foods may be carcinogenic. 4-Mel is labeled simply as “caramel coloring” on U.S. product labels and it gives foods its golden-brown color. The state of California has placed a limit on 4-Mel containing products to 29 micrograms. However, Consumer Reports has found that many products still exceeded the permitted limit and the same products outside of California contained amounts even greater. What is the best way to educate about dangers of consuming foods containing caramel coloring?

For additional information, please click CNN.

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Mediterranean diet may reduce Peripheral Artery Disease

oil-and-olive-10025527A recent randomized trial published in the Journal of the American Medical Association examined the association between Mediterranean diet and the incidence of symptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD). Patients were randomly selected to participate in one of the following groups: a Mediterranean diet high in extra-virgin olive oil; a Mediterranean diet high in nuts; or a low-fat diet. The results of the study found that both Mediterranean diet groups had a significantly lower occurrence of PAD compared to the low-fat diet group and no significant difference was found between the two intervention groups. How often do you recommend Mediterranean diet to your patients?

For additional information, please click JAMA.

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